Bone Health versus Fosamax, Boniva…

June 23, 2012 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

 

             With the approval of Fosamax in 1995, there was basically one remedy for osteoporosis that most medical practitioners considered when addressing osteoporosis. When I was first diagnosed with osteoporosis in 2004, the medical industry was still advocating bisphosphonates (Fosamax, Boniva…) even for pre-menopausal women.  Fosamax enjoyed top billing as the remedy for osteoporosis despite that clinical studies did not show that taking Fosamax reduced fracture rates.

In time, with the plethora of adverse side effects being exposed, more and more doctors began only recommending Fosamax and it’s “cousins” for post-menopausal women.  But still, very few people in the medical field were acknowledging that there was more to osteoporotic fractures than low bone density, and most didn’t consider that people had natural options for strengthening their bones.

As a research biochemist, I have had the opportunity to manipulate systems and evaluate the outcomes. Knowing how our bodies function on the cellular level and how cells respire, I combed the research and clinical studies that claimed to effect bone formation and the activation of osteoblasts (bone forming cells). From these studies, I knew that natural options for increasing bone health had the more promising potential for yielding stronger, healthier bones. This is supported by impressive research.

Advancements in Thinking About Osteoporosis

June 23, 2012 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

    

I am happy to see that the medical field is  expanding its perspective in its approaches for addressing bone health. In a January 18, 2012 article in The New York Times titled “Patients With Normal Bone Density Can Delay Retests, Study Suggests,” medical reporter Gina Kolata writes that the study “is part of a broad rethinking of how to diagnose and treat” bone loss. She further points out how the medical community itself isn’t convinced medications prescribed to treat osteoporosis are your best option for bone health. Kolata writes “…medical experts no longer recommend the medicines (bisphosphonates) to prevent osteoporosis itself. They no longer want women to take them indefinitely, and no longer consider bone density measurements the sole defining factor in deciding if a woman needs to be treated.”

It is encouraging to see that health care professionals are broadening their views on the best ways to address bone health and osteoporosis.