Junk Food and Osteoporosis

March 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

Studies done by Ron Zernicke (dean of University of Michigan’s School of Kinesiology) and Cy Frank (executive director of the Alberta Bone and Joint Health Institution) have confirmed that sugar and fat intake plays a role in the development osteoporosis through the weakening of bones.

Diets high in sugar and saturated fats prevent calcium absorption, and saturated fats can form insoluble “soaps” that coat the intestines. Both of these effects on the body don’t allow the necessary quantity of calcium to keep bones strong.

Zernicke and Frank have noted that osteoporosis due to poor diet will begin to affect baby boomers in large numbers if this lack-of-nutrition trend continues. Frank notes that one in three women will break a hip by age 85 from osteoporosis. More frightening still, he adds, is that about 20 percent of these women will die within a year of the injury.

To take charge of your bone health you should limit junk food and try to incorporate the following:

• Develop an alkaline diet

• Supplement your body with key nutrients for building strong bones

• Exercise ½ to 1 hour each day

• Commit to seek more happiness and less stress

References:
http://www.bignewsnetwork.com
http://www.upi.com
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk

Early Menopause Increases Risk of Osteoporosis

March 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

Swedish research now confirms what other research has suggested…menopause occurring before the age of 47 is linked to an increased risk of osteoporosis and fracture as women age.

Specifically, at age 77 56% of women who experienced an early menopause (average age of 42) had osteoporosis, while only 30% of those who went into menopause at age 47 or later had the diagnosis. Also, fracture incidence was higher among those entering menopause before age 47.

Therefore, women should use early menopause as a call to take action to give their bones the head start they need to stay healthy and strong. Developing and maintaining a healthy bones lifestyle is important:

• Develop an alkaline diet

• Supplement your body with key nutrients for building strong bones

• Exercise ½ to 1 hour each day

• Commit to seek more happiness and less stress

While the age at which we experience menopause may have complicated origins due to many factors, there’s plenty that we can do to build and maintain strong, healthy bones at any age. And remember, having an increased risk for osteoporosis is still not a guarantee that you’ll suffer from osteoporosis or a fracture – especially when there’s the opportunity to take action.

 

Reference: Svejme, O, HG Ahlborg, JÅ Nilsson, MK Karlsson. 2012. Early menopause and risk of osteoporosis, fracture and mortality: a 34-year prospective observational study in 390 women. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03324.x.

FDA Study: More Reasons to Decline Osteoporosis Drugs

October 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

 

 

The May 9, 2012 article published in the NY Times titled “Well; FDA Is Wary Of Lengthy Use Of Bone Drugs,” by Tara Parker-Pope, suggests that the FDA’s newest study may have made many women and doctors think twice about using Fosamax or its relatives to treat osteoporosis. This article was printed on the heels of a published analysis by The Food and Drug Administration urging caution about long-term use of these osteoporosis drugs. The long-term safety of bone drugs has become more and more a concern among those who prescribe them, yet the pharmaceutical companies continue to have their products be on the top of most doctors’ recommended list for osteoporosis treatment. Now that the F.D.A.’s own analysis finds  little, if any benefit from the drugs after three to five years of use, it will be interesting to see if there is a change in this trend.

There are healthy ways to address osteoporosis, and even reverse bone loss. This news often surprises people given the propensity for doctors to prescribe bisphosphonates and the marketing campaigns of drug manufacturers that say you can only prevent bone fractures by using their products. However, the truth is that a natural approach to bone health that includes good nutrition and exercise, can strengthen bone and reverse bone loss even if you have already been diagnosed with osteoporosis.

 

 

Bone Health versus Fosamax, Boniva…

June 23, 2012 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

 

             With the approval of Fosamax in 1995, there was basically one remedy for osteoporosis that most medical practitioners considered when addressing osteoporosis. When I was first diagnosed with osteoporosis in 2004, the medical industry was still advocating bisphosphonates (Fosamax, Boniva…) even for pre-menopausal women.  Fosamax enjoyed top billing as the remedy for osteoporosis despite that clinical studies did not show that taking Fosamax reduced fracture rates.

In time, with the plethora of adverse side effects being exposed, more and more doctors began only recommending Fosamax and it’s “cousins” for post-menopausal women.  But still, very few people in the medical field were acknowledging that there was more to osteoporotic fractures than low bone density, and most didn’t consider that people had natural options for strengthening their bones.

As a research biochemist, I have had the opportunity to manipulate systems and evaluate the outcomes. Knowing how our bodies function on the cellular level and how cells respire, I combed the research and clinical studies that claimed to effect bone formation and the activation of osteoblasts (bone forming cells). From these studies, I knew that natural options for increasing bone health had the more promising potential for yielding stronger, healthier bones. This is supported by impressive research.

Advancements in Thinking About Osteoporosis

June 23, 2012 by  
Filed under Osteoporosis

    

I am happy to see that the medical field is  expanding its perspective in its approaches for addressing bone health. In a January 18, 2012 article in The New York Times titled “Patients With Normal Bone Density Can Delay Retests, Study Suggests,” medical reporter Gina Kolata writes that the study “is part of a broad rethinking of how to diagnose and treat” bone loss. She further points out how the medical community itself isn’t convinced medications prescribed to treat osteoporosis are your best option for bone health. Kolata writes “…medical experts no longer recommend the medicines (bisphosphonates) to prevent osteoporosis itself. They no longer want women to take them indefinitely, and no longer consider bone density measurements the sole defining factor in deciding if a woman needs to be treated.”

It is encouraging to see that health care professionals are broadening their views on the best ways to address bone health and osteoporosis.